Welsh Union Flag

The United Kingdom is made up of four countries. England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Three of these countries have representation in the national flag.
                          
The lack of Welsh representation is clearly noticeable when the flag is broken down like this.The reason for this is that at the time of the 1606 union Wales was seen as a Principality of England. But in modern UK Wales is a self governing region with equal status of the other three nations within the UK. However unlike when the Kingdom of Ireland became an equal partner in the UK no adjustments or changes to the flag have been made. The flag of Wales used by the devolved Welsh Government, Wales Office and sports teams is a red dragon on a green and white field:
                           File:Flag of Wales 2.svg
This flag was adopted in this form in 1959 although its origins are very ancient. A number of proposals have been made to incorporate the dragon in the Union Flag:
                     
In my opinion this is ugly and unimaginative. But I do feel there is a solution. If one looks at the Northern Ireland flag (Which as is mentioned in my last post was only official between 1953-73) and NI's representation you will see that they are completely different. the NI flag bearing the red hand of Ulster, where the Union Jack bears St Patrick's cross. NI is in effect represented by the flag of it's patron saint. So therefore I would include the cross of St David to represent Wales:
                      File:Flag of Saint David.svg
Some people have come up with designs featuring this:
                     
                                        
The problem with these is that they change the flag completely, and generally speaking British people don't usually like big radical changes. My solution to this is very much in-line of putting St David's cross behind that of St George:

It is still recognisable as the Union Jack and the change is minimal but all four nations are represented. The cross of St David is clearly visible behind that of St George which has retained it white edge.

0 comments:

Post a Comment